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    Temple, TX 76502
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Pediatric Dentistry Temple TX Dental

Pediatric Dentistry Temple TX Dental

Question: Should I clean my baby’s teeth or consult a Pediatric Dentistry specialist?

Absolutely! Even before the first tooth emerges, it's crucial to maintain oral hygiene. Gently wipe your baby's gums and cheeks with a soft, clean cloth after every feeding. Once the first tooth appears, pediatric dentists recommend using a small, soft-bristled toothbrush to clean their teeth after meals. However, avoiding toothpaste is essential, as young children tend to swallow most of it. Swallowing excessive fluoride toothpaste can result in permanent staining of the teeth, known as dental fluorosis.

Ari Marco

HQ Dental team have done fantastic high quality routine and cosmetic work on my teeth as well as my families. There is no better dentist in Georgetown.

Tan Nguyen

HQ Dental is among the best dental clinics I have visited. I think their secret is the true care of patients.

Anastassia Moser

Everyone who worked in my mouth was extremely gentle, yet thorough. They’ve certainly found a patient for life

Question: Brushing my child's teeth is challenging. Any suggestions?



One technique you can try, recommended by Pediatric Dentistry specialists, is having your child lie down. You can place your child on your lap or the floor, ensuring their head is stabilized with your legs. Alternatively, if your child is standing, have them face away from you with their head slightly tilted and resting against your body. To make the process more engaging, encourage your child to hold a mirror while you brush and floss their teeth. This way, they can observe your actions and become more involved in their oral care routine, a valuable approach supported by Pediatric Dentistry experts.

Question: Is it necessary to brush before bed?



Yes, according to guidance from Pediatric Dentistry specialists, it is crucial to prioritize brushing before bed. If you have to skip a brushing session, missing the bedtime routine is especially unfavorable. When you fail to eliminate the bacteria and sugar that contribute to cavities, they have the entire night to wreak havoc on teeth. While awake, saliva helps keep the mouth clean; however, during sleep, saliva production decreases, leading to reduced self-cleaning abilities. Therefore, brushing before bedtime is essential to maintain optimal oral health, a recommendation strongly emphasized by Pediatric Dentistry experts.

How to Brush Your Child's Teeth: Ensuring Optimal Oral Care?



Plaque accumulates daily on the surfaces of teeth and gums, including the inner, outer, and chewing areas. Brushing is a highly effective method, as recommended by Pediatric Dentistry specialists, for removing plaque and maintaining oral health. When choosing a toothbrush, as advised by Pediatric Dentistry experts, opt for soft, rounded bristles, which are gentle on delicate gums. Remember that children require a smaller brush than adults, and their manual dexterity may not yet be fully developed. Until they reach 8-10 years old, it's crucial, according to Pediatric Dentistry guidance, to supervise and assist your child during brushing to ensure thorough cleaning.

Regularly inspect the toothbrush's bristles and replace them when bent or frayed. Once your child's teeth start touching each other, it's time to introduce flossing as an additional step to remove plaque between the teeth.

Teething can cause discomfort for your baby, leading to restlessness and irritability. However, it's important to note that symptoms like fever, vomiting, or diarrhea are not typically associated with teething. If these symptoms occur, consult your pediatrician for appropriate evaluation and guidance.

Signs Indicating Your Baby is Teething: Red cheeks or cheek rash Increased saliva or drooling Restlessness Irritability Decreased appetite

What to Do If Your Child is Teething?



Give your child a cold, hard object to chew on, such as a teething ring, as recommended by Pediatric Dentistry specialists, to alleviate discomfort. The coldness, according to Pediatric Dentistry advice, helps soothe the gums, while the firmness promotes tooth eruption. Additionally, gently massaging your child's gums with a clean finger, a technique often suggested by Pediatric Dentistry experts, can help alleviate pain during teething. Teething gels or ointments, as recommended by Pediatric Dentistry professionals, can numb the gums and reduce discomfort. Consult your pharmacist for recommended brands. It's essential to avoid teething cookies or biscuits, as advised by Pediatric Dentistry, as they often contain sugar, which can contribute to tooth decay.

Child Dental Sealants: Protecting Your Child's Teeth



Dental sealants, as recommended by Pediatric Dentistry specialists, are thin plastic coverings applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth, particularly prone to cavities. These sealants, in accordance with Pediatric Dentistry recommendations, create a protective barrier that prevents bacteria and food from accumulating in the indentations and pits of the teeth. They are most commonly recommended by Pediatric Dentistry for the first permanent molars, which typically erupt around age 6, and the second molars, which emerge around age 12.

To ensure optimal effectiveness, it is essential to have the sealants applied by a qualified dentist, such as Dr. Hiep Pham, DDS at Temple Dentist, as soon as the tooth has fully erupted. In some cases, sealants may also be recommended for premolars that exhibit deep pits and fissures.

Before applying the sealant material, the tooth surface is prepared using a dental solution. This solution cleans the tooth surface and enhances the bond between the sealant and the enamel. Once applied, sealants can last for several years, but it is essential to have them examined during your child's regular dental checkups.

Even if a sealant becomes lost, the material penetrating the enamel will continue to provide protection. Lost sealants can be easily replaced. It is worth noting that sealants are highly effective, with a success rate of nearly 100%, in preventing deterioration on the chewing surfaces of the back teeth. For protection against decay on the smooth surfaces of the teeth, fluoride is an additional preventive measure that can be utilized.

Thumb-Sucking and Your Child's Dental Health: Promoting Healthy Habits



Thumb-sucking or finger-sucking, as recognized by Pediatric Dentistry experts, is a common habit among infants, which diminishes naturally by age four. However, if the sucking habit persists beyond the eruption of permanent teeth, it can lead to dental issues, as emphasized by Pediatric Dentistry specialists, such as crooked teeth and a malformed palate (roof of the mouth). These problems, according to Pediatric Dentistry, arise due to the pressure exerted by the thumb on the teeth and the roof of the mouth.

The severity of the issue, as noted by Pediatric Dentistry professionals, depends on the frequency, intensity, duration, and positioning of the thumb in the mouth. The association between the upper and lower jaws can also be affected, potentially resulting in speech difficulties associated with misaligned teeth caused by thumb-sucking or finger-sucking.

Treatment:



The best preventive measure, as advised by Pediatric Dentistry experts, is encouraging your newborn to use a pacifier instead of thumb-sucking or finger-sucking, according to guidance from Pediatric Dentistry. While prolonged pacifier use can present similar problems, the advantage, as emphasized by Pediatric Dentistry specialists, is that it can be easily removed since it is not attached to the child. It's advisable, with the support of Pediatric Dentistry, to help children abandon these habits before they enter school to prevent potential teasing. The timing of treatment, as stressed by Pediatric Dentistry, is crucial, and your child must be willing to give up thumb-sucking or finger-sucking.

If your child is not ready to stop, therapy, as suggested by Pediatric Dentistry experts, is usually not recommended. Applying pressure to cease the habit may result in resistance and lack of cooperation, according to Pediatric Dentistry guidance. It's better, as recommended by Pediatric Dentistry, to try again later. Give your child attention, understanding, and gentle discouragement of the habit, a strategy often endorsed by Pediatric Dentistry specialists. Simple reminders like placing a band-aid on the thumb can be helpful, according to Pediatric Dentistry recommendations. Additionally, consider offering rewards such as stars on a chart, dimes, or extra story time for days when your child successfully refrains from thumb-sucking or finger-sucking, as Pediatric Dentistry experts suggest. Remember to praise your child for their achievements along the way, in line with Pediatric Dentistry principles.

If you're a parent struggling to help your child stop thumb-sucking, don't worry, you're not alone, as acknowledged by Pediatric Dentistry. While it's a common habit among children, addressing it before it leads to dental problems is essential, a principle emphasized by Pediatric Dentistry specialists. One effective solution, as recommended by Pediatric Dentistry experts, is using a finger guard, a soft and flexible device that fits over the thumb and prevents sucking, a strategy that can be recommended by Pediatric Dentistry. However, it's important to note that the guard should only be used during activities that trigger thumb-sucking, such as watching TV or reading a book, in accordance with Pediatric Dentistry advice. In addition, it's crucial to gradually reduce the amount of time your child spends sucking their thumb, as highlighted by Pediatric Dentistry specialists. If your child has difficulty breaking the habit, seek assistance from a healthcare professional who can provide additional guidance and support, including guidance from Pediatric Dentistry experts.

Fluoride: Enhancing Dental Health



Dental decay is a prevalent issue in North America, but fluoride is one effective way to prevent it. Fluoride is vital in strengthening tooth enamel and increasing its resistance to decay. In fact, fluoride can even aid in the remineralization process, which can halt and reverse early-stage cavities. There are two primary methods of delivering fluoride to the teeth: topically and systemically.

Systemic Fluoride



Systemic fluoride reaches the tooth surface through the bloodstream. It can be obtained from various sources, including food, water, or dietary supplements such as pills, tablets, or drops. Fluoridated water is particularly effective in reducing the prevalence of dental decay, with studies showing that it can decrease tooth decay by up to 60%.

Some water supplies naturally contain fluoride, while others have fluoride intentionally added. However, it's important to note that specific communities may have limited access to fluoridated water, while others may be unaware of this option. Contact your local water or health department for information if you're unsure about your community's water supply.

Systemic fluoride is most beneficial for children between birth and 14 years of age. When fluoride is ingested during this period, it travels through the bloodstream and becomes incorporated into developing teeth. As a result, the enamel structure of the developing tooth becomes more resilient against acid attacks.

By incorporating fluoride into your dental care routine, whether through topical applications or systemic means, you can significantly enhance your dental health and reduce the risk of tooth decay.

Topical Fluoride: Enhancing Dental Health After Tooth Eruption



While the most significant benefits of fluoride, as recognized by Pediatric Dentistry, are realized before teeth erupt, it continues to be highly advantageous for both children and adults once their teeth have fully emerged, as supported by Pediatric Dentistry experts. Topical fluoride treatments, according to Pediatric Dentistry recommendations, are directly applied to the tooth surface, helping to delay or slow down the progression of tooth decay. Various forms of topical fluoride, as noted by Pediatric Dentistry, include:

Toothpaste, which, as advised by Pediatric Dentistry, should be used daily. Look for toothpaste with an ADA or CDA Seal of Acceptance on the label to ensure its effectiveness, as recommended by Pediatric Dentistry specialists.

Professional fluoride application, as recommended by Pediatric Dentistry experts, involves applying fluoride gel in a tray for 1 to 4 minutes at the end of a dental appointment. Not everyone requires this treatment; its necessity, as emphasized by Pediatric Dentistry, depends on individual oral health needs.

Fluoridated home mouth rinses, which can be purchased for children over six years old and adults prone to cavities, as noted by Pediatric Dentistry specialists.

Home care fluoride gels, as recommended by Pediatric Dentistry professionals, are applied using trays or a brush and benefit individuals highly susceptible to cavities, including adults with high root cavities, those with parched mouths, individuals with braces or orthodontic appliances, and those experiencing rampant or excessive cavities. Fluoride gels for home use can be obtained over the counter or by prescription, as guided by Pediatric Dentistry. Feel free to consult us for a personalized daily home fluoride program tailored to your needs, as Pediatric Dentistry experts can assist in creating such programs.

Although the optimal benefits of fluoride, as acknowledged by Pediatric Dentistry, occur before tooth eruption, incorporating topical fluoride into your daily oral care routine remains an essential defense against tooth decay, a principle strongly emphasized by Pediatric Dentistry specialists.

Topical Fluoride: Enhancing Dental Health After Tooth Eruption



While the most significant benefits of fluoride, as recognized by Pediatric Dentistry, are realized before teeth erupt, it continues to be highly advantageous for both children and adults once their teeth have fully emerged, as supported by Pediatric Dentistry experts. Topical fluoride treatments, according to Pediatric Dentistry recommendations, are directly applied to the tooth surface, helping to delay or slow down the progression of tooth decay. Various forms of topical fluoride, as noted by Pediatric Dentistry, include:

Toothpaste, which, as advised by Pediatric Dentistry, should be used daily. Look for toothpaste with an ADA or CDA Seal of Acceptance on the label to ensure its effectiveness, as recommended by Pediatric Dentistry specialists.

Professional fluoride application, as recommended by Pediatric Dentistry experts, involves applying fluoride gel in a tray for 1 to 4 minutes at the end of a dental appointment. Not everyone requires this treatment; its necessity, as emphasized by Pediatric Dentistry, depends on individual oral health needs.

Fluoridated home mouth rinses, which can be purchased for children over six years old and adults prone to cavities, as noted by Pediatric Dentistry specialists.

Home care fluoride gels, as recommended by Pediatric Dentistry professionals, are applied using trays or a brush and benefit individuals highly susceptible to cavities, including adults with high root cavities, those with parched mouths, individuals with braces or orthodontic appliances, and those experiencing rampant or excessive cavities. Fluoride gels for home use can be obtained over the counter or by prescription, as guided by Pediatric Dentistry. Feel free to consult us for a personalized daily home fluoride program tailored to your needs, as Pediatric Dentistry experts can assist in creating such programs.

Although the optimal benefits of fluoride, as acknowledged by Pediatric Dentistry, occur before tooth eruption, incorporating topical fluoride into your daily oral care routine remains an essential defense against tooth decay, a principle strongly emphasized by Pediatric Dentistry specialists.

Topical Fluoride: Enhancing Dental Health After Tooth Eruption



While the most significant benefits of fluoride, as recognized by Pediatric Dentistry, are realized before teeth erupt, it continues to be highly advantageous for both children and adults once their teeth have fully emerged, as supported by Pediatric Dentistry experts. Topical fluoride treatments, according to Pediatric Dentistry recommendations, are directly applied to the tooth surface, helping to delay or slow down the progression of tooth decay. Various forms of topical fluoride, as noted by Pediatric Dentistry, include:

Toothpaste, which, as advised by Pediatric Dentistry, should be used daily. Look for toothpaste with an ADA or CDA Seal of Acceptance on the label to ensure its effectiveness, as recommended by Pediatric Dentistry specialists.

Professional fluoride application, as recommended by Pediatric Dentistry experts, involves applying fluoride gel in a tray for 1 to 4 minutes at the end of a dental appointment. Not everyone requires this treatment; its necessity, as emphasized by Pediatric Dentistry, depends on individual oral health needs.

Fluoridated home mouth rinses, which can be purchased for children over six years old and adults prone to cavities, as noted by Pediatric Dentistry specialists.

Home care fluoride gels, as recommended by Pediatric Dentistry professionals, are applied using trays or a brush and benefit individuals highly susceptible to cavities, including adults with high root cavities, those with parched mouths, individuals with braces or orthodontic appliances, and those experiencing rampant or excessive cavities. Fluoride gels for home use can be obtained over the counter or by prescription, as guided by Pediatric Dentistry. Feel free to consult us for a personalized daily home fluoride program tailored to your needs, as Pediatric Dentistry experts can assist in creating such programs.

Although the optimal benefits of fluoride, as acknowledged by Pediatric Dentistry, occur before tooth eruption, incorporating topical fluoride into your daily oral care routine remains an essential defense against tooth decay, a principle strongly emphasized by Pediatric Dentistry specialists.

Fluoride Safety: Proper Usage and Preventing Adverse Effects



Fluoride is highly effective in controlling dental decay when used correctly. However, it is essential to be mindful of potential risks such as fluoride toxicity and dental fluorosis if not used in appropriate doses.

Fluoride toxicity happens when large amounts of fluoride are ingested quickly. This can pose health risks. Symptoms may include unsettled stomach, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, increased salivation, or increased thirst. These symptoms typically emerge within 30 minutes of ingestion and may last up to 24 hours.

Specific emergency measures should be taken in the event of a toxic fluoride overdose. If experiencing nausea, drinking milk, or attempting to induce vomiting can be helpful, contacting us or a physician is crucial. If the symptoms persist or worsen (such as difficulty breathing), contact emergency services for immediate transport to the hospital.

Dental fluorosis, on the other hand, occurs due to excessive fluoride intake during tooth development stages. It ranges from mild signs, such as white specks on teeth, to more severe manifestations, like brown staining and enamel pitting.

To safeguard your child against the adverse effects of fluoride, adhere to some basic guidelines:

Fluoridated products should not be swallowed. Only a tiny amount of toothpaste, such as the size of a small pea, is sufficient for a kid. Fluoridated products, especially mouth rinses, should not be given to children under six or individuals who cannot rinse effectively (those likely to swallow some of the product). It is essential to keep fluoridated products out of the reach of children, and parental supervision is necessary when children brush or use any fluoride-containing substances. By following these precautions, you can ensure fluoride's safe and effective use for optimal dental health.

The First Dental Visit for Your Child: Essential Guidelines



To ensure optimal dental care for your child, their first visit to our dental office is recommended around their first birthday. However, it can be scheduled as soon as the first tooth erupts or even earlier if desired. Here are some important do's and don'ts to keep in mind:

Dos:

Please tour our dental office and bring your child for a casual and friendly visit. This will help them become familiar with the environment. Please schedule an appointment to visually check your child's teeth to assess their oral health. Engage in discussion with us about proper oral health care for your child. We can guide dental hygiene practices and answer any questions you may have. Consider bringing your child when you or a sibling have a dental appointment. This can help them observe the process and become more comfortable with dental visits.

DON'Ts:

Avoid waiting for an emergency to catalyze your child's first dental visit. It is best to establish a preventive approach to dental care early on. Refrain from overpreparing your children for dental visits. Excessive explanations or warnings about potential discomfort can create unnecessary anxiety. Trust our team to provide a positive and gentle experience for your child. Following these dos and don'ts ensures that your child's first dental visit is a positive and beneficial experience, laying the foundation for lifelong dental health.

Baby's First Teeth: Milestones and Importance



The first baby teeth to emerge are typically the two bottom front teeth, usually around 6 to 8 months of age. Following them are the four upper front teeth. The remaining baby teeth will gradually appear in pairs on each side of the jaw until your child reaches about 2 1/2 years old.

By the time your child stretches 2 1/2 years of age, all 20 baby teeth will likely have emerged. Between the ages of 5 to 6 years old, your child's first permanent teeth will start to come in. Some permanent teeth will replace baby teeth, while others will emerge in different locations. The accompanying picture provides an approximate timeline for the eruption of each baby tooth.

It's important to note that variations in timing, with teeth appearing a few months earlier or later, are common and entirely normal. Every child develops at their own pace, just as every adult is unique.

Although baby teeth will ultimately be replaced, they play a vital role and are equally important as adult teeth. They preserve space for incoming permanent teeth and are essential for biting, chewing speech, and overall physical appearance. Early tooth loss due to dental decay can significantly impact your child's self-esteem and confidence in their appearance.

Hence, from an early age, it is crucial to instill in your child the importance of maintaining a healthy diet and practicing daily oral hygiene. By emphasizing these habits, you help ensure healthy teeth and gums, setting the stage for a lifetime of beautiful smiles.

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay: Protecting Your Child's Dental Health



Baby Bottle Tooth Decay, also known as Baby Bottle Syndrome or Nursing Bottle Mouth, is a dental condition characterized by the rapid decay of many or all of an infant or child's baby teeth.

The upper front teeth are particularly susceptible to damage as they are among the first to erupt and thus have prolonged exposure to sugars in the bottle. The tongue generally shields the lower front teeth during sucking on a bottle nipple or breastfeeding.

The primary cause of Baby Bottle Tooth Decay is the frequent and prolonged exposure of a child's teeth to sugary liquids. When a baby falls asleep with a bottle containing formula, milk, or juice, or when a pacifier dipped in honey is used, the liquid accumulates around the front teeth. During sleep, the bacteria in the mouth convert the sugars into acids, leading to tooth decay.

Parents may not be aware of the problem until significant damage has already occurred. Regular oral checks by parents are essential to detect early signs of the condition. Brown spots along the gumline on your child's teeth are warning signs that should prompt attention. If your child prefers soft foods and experiences discomfort or fussiness when consuming cold, sweet, or hard foods, it is crucial to check them for tooth decay.

When tooth decay becomes noticeable, it may be too late, and treatment such as crowns, pulp therapy, or tooth extraction may be necessary. Consequently, your child may experience long-term complications, including speech impediments, potential psychological effects, misaligned or crowded teeth, and poor oral health.

However, you can prevent Baby Bottle Tooth Decay from affecting your child's teeth by following these preventive measures:

Clean your child's teeth daily.

Never allow your child to fall asleep with a bottle filled with juice, milk, or formula; discourage prolonged sipping on it as a pacifier.
Begin the process of bottle weaning by the age of one. Offer plain water for thirst. Ensure your child receives the necessary fluoride to prevent decay.
Schedule regular dental visits for your child, starting from the eruption of their first tooth.
Tip: Gradually dilute sugary bottles with water until they are solely water. Most children begin life with healthy teeth, and it is crucial to help maintain their oral health. As a parent, your decisions regarding your child's dental care will significantly impact their future dental well-being.

Pacifiers: A Guide to Usage and Dental Health



Babies have a natural inclination to suck as a way to nourish and comfort themselves. When a baby is not feeding, a pacifier is preferable to soothing over using a finger/thumb or a toy.

Pacifiers are less likely to cause malocclusion (misalignment of teeth) and are usually discontinued earlier than thumb-sucking. Removing a pacifier is generally easier than breaking the thumb-sucking habit, as thumb-suckers tend to continue the behavior until around 3-5 years of age.

Considerations for Pacifiers and Dental Health:



If you notice your child starting to suck their fingers or thumbs within the first three months of life, introducing a pacifier can be a suitable alternative.

To avoid any gum trauma, it's essential to choose a pacifier with a nipple made of rubber.

Use the pacifier only when necessary, and avoid constant or prolonged usage.

Rarely, pacifiers may lead to complications such as abnormal swallowing patterns. Monitor your child's pacifier use and consult a healthcare professional if any concerns arise.

Check the pacifier daily for any signs of breakage. Pacifiers do not last indefinitely, and a damaged pacifier can pose a choking hazard if the child sucks on a torn or ripped nipple.

Do not hang the pacifier around your baby's neck with a string or cord, as this could accidentally strangle the baby.

By following these guidelines, you can ensure the safe and appropriate use of pacifiers while promoting your child's dental health. Remember to consult healthcare professionals for personalized advice and recommendations regarding your child's pacifier use.

Choosing a Good Pacifier



When selecting a pacifier for your baby, it is essential to consider the potential adverse effects it could have on their jaw and teeth development. To prevent these issues, it is recommended to choose a pacifier that closely resembles the natural nipple and breast. Additionally, factors such as the size and shape of the pacifier, the strength of your baby's sucking action, and the amount of time the pacifier is in their mouth can all contribute to improper breathing and abnormal molding of the jaw. Selecting the correct pacifier and monitoring its use can help ensure your baby's healthy development.

Snacks and Your Child's Dental Health: Sugar Awareness

It's essential to be mindful of the impact of sugar-containing snacks on your child's dental health. Here are some key facts to consider:

Frequent snacking on sugary foods increases the risk of cavities in children.

When your child consumes sugary foods, the plaque in their mouth combines with the sugar to create acid.

Over time, these acid attacks can lead to the erosion of tooth structure.

Encourage your child to consume various foods from different food groups, including grains, milk and dairy products, meat, vegetables, and fruits.

Limiting foods high in sugar can help prevent the development of a strong preference for sweet tastes.

By being mindful of the sugar content in your child's snacks and promoting a balanced diet, you can help protect their dental health and reduce the risk of cavities.

Tips for Healthy Snacking Habits:



Opt for low-sugar snacks like vegetables, cheese, or pretzels to reduce the risk of tooth decay.

Limit the frequency of sugar consumption throughout the day. Frequent snacking keeps acidity levels in the mouth, increasing the risk of cavities.

Avoid sticky sweets, such as toffee or dried fruits, that can linger on and between teeth. Sticky foods contribute to prolonged acid production, increasing the likelihood of cavities.

Natural sugars, found in breast milk, fruit, milk, and bananas, have the same effect on teeth as refined sugars found in soda, ice cream, and cake. Enjoy healthy foods but remember to brush afterward to prevent tooth decay.

Limit sugar-rich foods that stay in the mouth and prolong acid attacks, such as gum, hard candies, and lollipops.

If you serve sweets, offer them during meals. Increased saliva flow during meals helps neutralize the effects of sugar.

Brush and floss after snacks and meals to prevent cavities caused by sugar exposure.

Dr. Hiep Pham, a dedicated pediatric dentist, believes in providing affordable and accessible dental care for local patients. With over two decades of experience, Dr. Hiep Pham and his team at Temple Dentist prioritize patient comfort and guide them through utilizing and maximizing their dental insurance coverage.

Located conveniently in Temple, Bell County, and surrounding areas, Temple Dentist offers children timely and convenient dental care. Dr. Hiep Pham is a participating provider with various PPO insurance companies, including Cigna, Ameritas, Maverest, Anthem BlueCross, Aetna, DenteMax, Geha Connection, Guardian, HealthNet, Humana, MetLife, Principal, United HealthCare, First Dental Health, Avesis, Dental Benefit Providers, Dentegra, and Assurant. Dr. Hiep Pham is also a premier provider with Delta Dental.

To learn more, visit Temple Dentist Office or call Dr. Hiep Pham at +1(254)773-1672 to schedule a consultation today.

Frequently Asked Questions About Pediatric Dentistry

Most children are recommended to visit Dr. Hiep Pham at Temple Dentist between 3 and 4. Before this age, young children may find sitting for a dental visit challenging. However, if you are a parent, you can bring your child along during your dental appointments. This allows them to observe a positive dental experience, such as teeth cleaning, and Dr. Hiep Pham may count their teeth to make their first visit pleasant. It’s best to avoid waiting until they experience a toothache.

At Temple Dentist, we emphasize the importance of baby teeth. These teeth enable children to chew their food, speak properly, and smile beautifully. Additionally, baby teeth are crucial in maintaining space in the jaw to develop adult teeth. If a baby tooth is lost prematurely, neighboring teeth may shift into the vacant space, potentially causing misalignment and crowding when adult teeth emerge.

Absolutely. Even before the first tooth appears, it is essential to gently wipe your baby’s gums and cheeks with a soft, clean cloth after feeding. Once the first tooth emerges, you can use a small, soft-bristled toothbrush to clean the tooth after meals. Avoid using toothpaste, as young children often swallow it, and excessive fluoride ingestion can lead to dental fluorosis, resulting in permanent spots on their teeth.

You can try different techniques to make toothbrushing more comfortable for you and your child. For instance, your child can lie on your lap or the floor while keeping their head steady with your legs. Alternatively, if your child stands, position them with their back to you, tilt their head slightly, and let it rest against your body. Providing a mirror for your child to hold while you brush and floss their teeth allows them to see what is happening.

Plaque builds up on teeth and gums’ inner, outer, and chewing surfaces every day. Brushing teeth is an effective way to remove this plaque. Use a toothbrush with soft, round-tipped bristles appropriate for a child’s more petite mouth. Supervising and assisting your child with brushing until they are 8-10 years old is essential to ensure a thorough cleaning. Replace the toothbrush when the bristles become bent or frayed. Start flossing your child’s teeth when they begin touching each other, and brushing alone cannot reach those spaces.

Baby bottle tooth decay refers to decay in infants and children, primarily affecting the upper front teeth, although other teeth may also be affected. It occurs when sweetened liquids, such as milk, formula, and fruit juice, are given to infants and left in contact with their teeth for extended periods. The bacteria in the mouth feed on these sugars, producing acids that attack the teeth. Frequent exposure to these acids can lead to tooth decay over time, causing damage to the baby’s teeth.